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August 6, 2008

I felt like a fish in an oven

Posted: 01:59 PM ET

Our cross-country road trip using biodiesel fuel motors on toward New Orleans, Louisiana.

cody.brian

Brian Hardy and I rest after broadcasting Wednesday on CNN.com Live.

After we over-nighted in Fort Worth, Texas, we’ll see if it really takes eight-and-a-half hours to drive to the Big Easy - as those “directions Web sites” suggest.

We’re hoping to visit New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward on Thursday to see how it’s doing nearly three years after residents were hit hard by Hurricane Katrina. Because we lost so much time due to mechanical troubles in Arizona, it looks like we’ll have to cancel our planned visit to Natchez, Mississippi.

I have to tell you that Tuesday was one of the longest drives of our trip so far – we drove about 500 miles in one day. It also was one of the hottest. With no air conditioning in our 1978 Scout, I felt like a piece of fish in an oven. I was just roasting. My skin was dry and cracking and basically I pleaded with my co-pilot Brian Hardy to stop at a convenience store so we could stand in the a/c for about ten minutes.

– Cody

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Filed under: environment • Road trip


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Gabriel- Dallas, TX   August 6th, 2008 2:18 pm ET

Why does Melissa Long keep saying you're in an International Harvester? inside joke, maybe?


S Callahan   August 6th, 2008 2:49 pm ET

Nice feet :-)

While in New Orleans maybe a few of the activist movie stars can show you around. I had read an article somewhere that homes are being built with solar energy -which sure would save a nightmare for those suffering with high utilities and small filled wallets.

I have a deep empathy for what so many people went through in 'Orleans...separted from family by death and circumstance, no money to resettle, lost of all possession, apathy from Government which seems ongoing, and the list goes on. They certainly have demonstrated God's spirit in their resilence in overcoming so much. This area would be a great sample area for the Government to utilize all the newer technology centered on energy savings and efficency.

Brian and Cody , you're both doing a teriffic job on your journey...we appreciate your efforts and discomforts in he terrible heat, isolation, etc.
CNN should throw you a welcome party when you arrive at your final destenation..maybe even a promoter of disel fuel useage can give you a new car./truck :-)


Nic "Scoutman" Hawker   August 6th, 2008 2:52 pm ET

International Harvester is the company that produced the Scout. Cody and Brian are driving an International Harvester Scout II. The Scout II's were produced from 1971 (72 model year) to 1980.
International Harvester was at one time bigger than GM and produced everything from farm tractors and implements to large semi-trucks to bull dozers to push mowers to refrigerators.
The International Harvester ceased to exist as one large company in 1984 or so. The majority of the company, mostly comprised of large over-the-road semis and mid size semis like school buses, continued under the name "International Navistar".
The International Harvester name was sold with the tractor equipment to a company named Case. They continue as "Case International"
International Navistar has morphed into The International Truck and Engine Corporation. The still hold a large share of the world's truck and engine market.

Side note: International was the first company that combined a harvester and a thresher, the result was a piece called a "Combine". They were also one of the first to build a twine binder machine. This gained all International products the nickname "Cornbinder".
So Cody is driving a Cornbinder.


HAM   August 6th, 2008 3:05 pm ET

Put on a fire resistant jump suit, 65 pounds of protective gear, roll up the windows, wear goggles, gloves and boots, and you can imagine Al Anbar (without the fear)...

Safe jouney fellas...


sunny   August 6th, 2008 4:03 pm ET

So how are you doing at finding the biodiesel? That's what I want to know. I want to do a crosscountry trip myself, and I anticipate the main issue will be finding biodiesel, or isn't that being a problem? And hopefully something about how much you are paying for it.

What info resources are you using to find your biodiesel? If you're saying this on TV, sorry, I've missed the TV part.


AJ   August 6th, 2008 5:33 pm ET

I recently made that drive (from Dallas to NOLA) and it took me 6.5 hours (avg. 88 mph).

I live in NOLA and progress is not the word I'd use to describe the Lower 9th.


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